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Results from the 2014 gay men’s health survey


THE GAY MEN'S SEXUAL HEALTH RESEARCH GROUP THE GAY MEN'S SEXUAL HEALTH RESEARCH GROUP
The Gay Men’s Sexual Health research group (GMSH) is based in the Department of Social and Community Health at the University of Auckland. It was established in 2013 with seeding grants from the New Zealand AIDS Foundation and Uniservices Ltd. The group aims to promote research into HIV and sexual health among gay, bisexual, takataapui and other men who have sex with men (MSM) in New Zealand.

BGO_Poster_GAPSS_2014_Final

What is GAPSS about?

The Gay Auckland Periodic Sex Survey (GAPSS) and Gay men’s Online Sex Survey (GOSS) are anonymous repeat cross-sectional programmes that monitor trends in HIV risk behaviours among gay, bisexual, takataapui and other men who have sex with men (MSM) in New Zealand.

The surveys are funded by the Ministry of Health and undertaken collaboratively by the University of Auckland, University of Otago AIDS Epidemiology Group, and New Zealand AIDS Foundation. They are guided by UNAIDS/WHO principles of second-generation HIV behavioural surveillance and have three main aims:

  • to explain patterns in HIV diagnoses in New Zealand
  • to evaluate HIV prevention by monitoring condom use and testing, including disparities between subgroups of MSM
  • to forewarn of emerging HIV and STI risks and enable a timely response

GAPSS has recruited participants from gay community events, gay bars and sex-on-site venues in Auckland in 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2011, and 2014. GOSS has recruited participants from Internet dating sites in 2006, 2008, 2011 and 2014 nationwide. At 14,841 responses they provide the largest datasets of gay and bisexual men’s experiences in the country.

Other studies we are involved in

You can access other research projects undertaken by the GMSH here: https://www.fmhs.auckland.ac.nz/gmsh

Peter Saxton, Director, Gay Men’s Sexual Health research group

Usefulness in health promotion

We would be interested in finding out how communicating this kind of local research to health promoters and others working the sector can be utilised in your work and health promotion events. Start a discussion below with your ideas!

2 Comments

  1. Evelyn Mann 12/10/15 at 2:20 PM

  2. Alison Green 11/09/15 at 7:38 AM